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Just Gravy 7: Remembering the Comanche Three

While researching information for our Juneteenth episode, we came across this information about Booker T. Washington park on wikipedia: “…an estimated 30,000 black people celebrated at Booker T. Washington Park in Limestone County, Texas, established in 1898 for Juneteenth celebrations. Attendance at the Limestone County event fell off sharply in the wake of the 1981 drowning of three local teenagers while in the custody of a Limestone County sheriff’s deputy, a reserve deputy, and a probation officer.”

Wait, what?

There was no further information linked on wikipedia, so we began to read the article cited on the wikipedia page: The Ghosts of Comanche Crossing

This led us to a heartbreaking story about the untimely death of three teenagers while in police custody. Although the events that we talk about in this episode happened forty years ago, it all seems very present. We hope that we have done the story justice, and let more people know about the tragic events that happened that day.

Resources for Just Gravy 7:

Waco Tribune: Mexia faces long shadow of Juneteenth drowning 40 years ago

Texas Monthly: The Ghosts of Comanche Crossing

New York Times: Doubts Unresolved On Texas Drownings

***Correction from audio: More than 1,400 people attended the funeral of Freeman and Baker, not 14,000. Please excuse Kelly, she is better with words than she is numbers.

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Episode

E. 14 Juneteenth: As American As BBQ Ribs

The pictures above came from the Library of Congress Public Archives, and if you have an afternoon (or week) to kill, we highly recommend you checking it out. There is a search bar to use when you have a key word, location, or event that you specifically want to find information about. In our case, the term “Juneteenth” resulted mostly in images from 2020 and Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington D.C. The term “Jubilee Day” was too broad, and “Emancipation Day” included far too many results.

Finally, the term “Black Celebration” (after applying several filters) retrieved the first picture in the set. There is little cited about the picture and although the assumption is that the crowd is gathered for the 4th of July, the time in which the photo was thought to be taken was June 1939. The location is St. Helena Island, South Carolina and although Juneteenth celebrations originated in Texas, they had become more commercialized and were common in the South at this time.

The second photo was a result of basically searching “Black people” and “Texas”. This photo is of a man sitting in front of a Barbecue stand in Corpus Cristi, TX. We love everything about this photo – from the expression on the man’s face; to the 7Up ad; to the galvanized metal exterior and promise of Hot Sausages. Barbecue is also significant to the rich food traditions of Juneteenth and symbolism of red food and drink.

Join us in this episode as we discuss the origins of the celebration, how it has been observed through history, and the food that plays such an important role in this Day.

Food photos and recipes from the recording are soon to come. If you would like to know how to make the Strawberry Red Mule we drank during this episode, head over to our Patreon and become a member! https://www.patreon.com/butterpecanpod

Sources for E. 14 Juneteenth: As American As BBQ Ribs:

What is Juneteenth?

How Red Food and Drink Joined the Juneteenth Feast

Wikipedia: Juneteenth

Texas Monthly: The Ghosts of Comanche Crossing

Wikipedia: Big Red (Soft Drink)

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E 13. David McAtee’s BBQ

On June 1, 2020 David McAtee was shot and killed by the National Guard in the West End neighborhood of Louisville, Ky. Moments before his death, he can be seen on video checking his BBQ.

Kelly and Darryl cover the McAtee’s life, the events leading to his death, and the aftermath a year later. We also share a meal of jerk chicken, collard greens, and mac n’ cheese in honor of the man who sparked the idea for this podcast and continues to inspire us to be better.

We will be expanding more on BBQ in our next episode as we talk about and celebrate Juneteenth. But our discussion on BBQ does not end there – if you have any family BBQ secrets, memories or thoughts on David McAtee, or personal ways you celebrate Juneteenth, please comment below or send us an email at butterpecanpod@gmail.com

Sources for Episode 13. David McAtee’s BBQ

Wikipedia: Shooting of David McAtee

Louisville Barbecue Owner Killed in Police Shooting Fed a Food Desert

A Popular Louisville Restaurant Owner Was Killed by the Police. What Happened?

One year later, BBQ owner David McAtee remembered with two memorials in West Louisville

No Charges for Kentucky National Guard Members in Shooting of Barbecue Chef

David McAtee’s Family Mark One-Year Anniversary Of His Killing With Balloons, BBQ 

‘I cannot stand it’: family of Louisville man shot dead by police speak out

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E11&12. Filipino Invasion

Part 1 Camille Pase Interview
Part 2 Philippine-American History
Camille with her family

In Part 1, we talk with our friend Camille about immigrating to the U.S. as a child. She reminisces about some of her favorite foods and the meals she now makes with her family.

Camille discusses the joy and struggles her family had living first in California and then Kentucky. She was also kind enough to share her recipe for Bibingkang Malagit along with family photos.

From Library of Congress Photo Archives

In the second part of our series focusing on the Philippines, Kelly and Darryl review some of the history the U.S. has with the Philippines, including Manilamen settling in Louisiana, the war against the Philippines at the turn of the 20th century, and the relationship between Filipinx and Black Lives Matter.

Sources for Episode 11. Filipino Invasion

FANHSWhy Filipino Americans Should Be In Solidarity With Black Lives Matter: Lessons From American History

Wiki Anti-Filipino Sentiment

Wiki Philippine-American War

WAPO: A ‘SPLENDID LITTLE WAR’ BUILT AMERICA’S EMPIRE

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Just Gravy 6: Q&A with Darryl and Kelly

Want to get to know us? Then listen up!

We took a break from our usual conversation about history, race, and food to talk about ourselves (and food). Join us as we discuss how we became friends, what we like about each other, and what food has scarred us for life.

Thank you all for listening and supporting us. We are overwhelmed by the attention that the podcast has received, and look forward to what we hope will be an ongoing project for years to come.

Us:

9 Local Podcasts You Should Be Listening To

Food, Protest, and Podcasting

‘Is butter pecan ice cream a ‘Black thing’?’ Louisville podcast explores how race impacts food

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Drink Faygo!: An Episode 4 Re-Recording of Coca-Cola

With Coca-Cola back in the news (Delta and Coca-Cola Reverse Course on Georgia Voting Law, Stating ‘Crystal Clear’ Opposition ) we decided to revisit our series on Coca-Cola. We discuss Georgia’s recent voting legislation, the issues with Coke’s most recent statement (Statement From James Quincey), and re-visit our script from episode 4 regarding the 2000 discrimination case.

We had issues with the first recording of this episode and wanted to give listeners the opportunity to still have access to the informations. Our original recording from the episode is still available, but if you had difficulty listening or just skipped it altogether, you can catch up with us here.

Find sources in our original post of the episode: Coke Is Not It

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Just Gravy 5: Polio, Pepperoni, and Pizza Rat

The United States suffered its first polio epidemic in 1894, and it wouldn’t be until the 1950s that scientists could actually see the virus with a microscope and develop a vaccine. It was originally theorized that Black and Brown people did not suffer from the virus despite statistical evidence of outbreaks in Chicago and Maryland.

Join us as we discuss the racist history of polio, eat some delicious pizza made with toppings from Red Hog, and discuss how their business is carrying on the tradition of using the “whole animal”. There is also a special guest appearance from the mouse that is stalking Darryl’s home and keeps evading capture.

Just Gravy 5 Sources:

African-Americans, Polio and Racial Segregation
By Daniel J. Wilson, PhD

Race and the Politics of Polio
Warm Springs, Tuskegee, and the March of Dimes
Naomi Rogers, PhD

How the Poor Get Blamed for Disease
In the 1960s, health authorities capitalized on middle-class fears of urban decay to promote vaccination, redefining measles and polio as illnesses linked to poverty. By: ELENA CONIS

The History of Vaccines, An Educational Resource By The College of Physicians in Philadelphia

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E9&10. Fannie Lou Hamer in 2 Parts

Fannie Lou Hamer Part 1
Fannie Lou Hamer Part 2

In our 2 part series on Fannie Lou Hamer, we examine her life and accomplishments through the lens of farming and food justice.

Part 1 takes a look at Hamer’s early childhood in Mississippi including her polio diagnosis, working as a sharecropper, and her academic achievements. We set the scene for Mississippi and the U.S. from the time she was born in 1917 till the 1960s when she began her work in Civil Rights. Fannie Lou’s pre-icon years definitely had their struggles but we also include her leadership, success, and joy.

Part 2 picks up where we left off in the first episode – Hamer and a group of other Black folks trying to register to vote. We follow her as she steps into her first leadership role with SNCC and listen to part of her speech at the Democratic National Committee credential panel in 1964 that was so compelling, President Johnson interrupted it to try and silence her. Largely focusing on her work in food justice, we cover her incredible work with the Freedom Farm Cooperative and the Sunflower Pigs pig bank.

Sources for E 9 &10. Fannie Lou Hamer

Civil rights crusader Fannie Lou Hamer defied men — and presidents — who tried to silence her By: DeNeen L Brown

Mississippi Public Broadcasting: Fannie Lou Hamer Stand Up

PBS Fannie Lou Hamer American Experience

https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/fannie-lou-hamer

FLH Wikipedia

FLH Food Activism Pioneer in Food and Wine (by Nia-Raquelle Smith)

American Rhetoric Online Speech Bank

The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer: To Tell It Like it Is

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E8. Black n’ Cheese

Mac n’ Cheese is an all time favorite of ours, but Kelly did not realize that Darryl didn’t grow up with it as an “everyday food” until we recorded this episode. We investigate how Black culture made this food a special occasion dish and perfected it in a way that made it exceptional enough to serve it at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

We go all the way back to 1AD and trace the history of this pasta and cheese dish all the way through colonization, emancipation, and the era of soul food. Darryl cooks the mac n’ cheese he grew up with, which was one of the first dishes he helped out with in the kitchen, and we talk about our love for Tillamook cheese.

Sources for E8. Black n’ Cheese

THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF MACARONI AND CHEESE

The History of Slavery in the Cultivation of Mac & Cheese From Elitist Dish to Cultural Staple 

Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time

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E7. Dieting While Black Part 2

In Part 2 of Dieting While Black, Kelly and Darryl get into their own personal experiences dealing with body image and fat phobia. They review the history of fat phobia, race, and the long practice of “othering”. Myths about diets are revealed and they evaluate health (and lack of care) as another system that has been created in our culture and is supported by our government by giving more money to drug research instead of food subsidies.

They end the conversation by discussing self-care and ways that they move and exercise with love and care to their bodies. Food and Health and Bodies and Racism are all so tightly linked together, we hope you listen with an open mind.

Sources for Ep 7. Dieting While Black Part 2

CNN Healthline.

Examing the Racist Roots of Fat Phobia

Venus Figurines of the European Paleolithic: Symbols of Fertility or Attractiveness?

Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong

Fearing the Black Body

You Have the Right to Remain Fat