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E 13. David McAtee’s BBQ

On June 1, 2020 David McAtee was shot and killed by the National Guard in the West End neighborhood of Louisville, Ky. Moments before his death, he can be seen on video checking his BBQ.

Kelly and Darryl cover the McAtee’s life, the events leading to his death, and the aftermath a year later. We also share a meal of jerk chicken, collard greens, and mac n’ cheese in honor of the man who sparked the idea for this podcast and continues to inspire us to be better.

We will be expanding more on BBQ in our next episode as we talk about and celebrate Juneteenth. But our discussion on BBQ does not end there – if you have any family BBQ secrets, memories or thoughts on David McAtee, or personal ways you celebrate Juneteenth, please comment below or send us an email at butterpecanpod@gmail.com

Sources for Episode 13. David McAtee’s BBQ

Wikipedia: Shooting of David McAtee

Louisville Barbecue Owner Killed in Police Shooting Fed a Food Desert

A Popular Louisville Restaurant Owner Was Killed by the Police. What Happened?

One year later, BBQ owner David McAtee remembered with two memorials in West Louisville

No Charges for Kentucky National Guard Members in Shooting of Barbecue Chef

David McAtee’s Family Mark One-Year Anniversary Of His Killing With Balloons, BBQ 

‘I cannot stand it’: family of Louisville man shot dead by police speak out

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E11&12. Filipino Invasion

Part 1 Camille Pase Interview
Part 2 Philippine-American History
Camille with her family

In Part 1, we talk with our friend Camille about immigrating to the U.S. as a child. She reminisces about some of her favorite foods and the meals she now makes with her family.

Camille discusses the joy and struggles her family had living first in California and then Kentucky. She was also kind enough to share her recipe for Bibingkang Malagit along with family photos.

From Library of Congress Photo Archives

In the second part of our series focusing on the Philippines, Kelly and Darryl review some of the history the U.S. has with the Philippines, including Manilamen settling in Louisiana, the war against the Philippines at the turn of the 20th century, and the relationship between Filipinx and Black Lives Matter.

Sources for Episode 11. Filipino Invasion

FANHSWhy Filipino Americans Should Be In Solidarity With Black Lives Matter: Lessons From American History

Wiki Anti-Filipino Sentiment

Wiki Philippine-American War

WAPO: A ‘SPLENDID LITTLE WAR’ BUILT AMERICA’S EMPIRE

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Just Gravy 6: Q&A with Darryl and Kelly

Want to get to know us? Then listen up!

We took a break from our usual conversation about history, race, and food to talk about ourselves (and food). Join us as we discuss how we became friends, what we like about each other, and what food has scarred us for life.

Thank you all for listening and supporting us. We are overwhelmed by the attention that the podcast has received, and look forward to what we hope will be an ongoing project for years to come.

Us:

9 Local Podcasts You Should Be Listening To

Food, Protest, and Podcasting

‘Is butter pecan ice cream a ‘Black thing’?’ Louisville podcast explores how race impacts food

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Drink Faygo!: An Episode 4 Re-Recording of Coca-Cola

With Coca-Cola back in the news (Delta and Coca-Cola Reverse Course on Georgia Voting Law, Stating ‘Crystal Clear’ Opposition ) we decided to revisit our series on Coca-Cola. We discuss Georgia’s recent voting legislation, the issues with Coke’s most recent statement (Statement From James Quincey), and re-visit our script from episode 4 regarding the 2000 discrimination case.

We had issues with the first recording of this episode and wanted to give listeners the opportunity to still have access to the informations. Our original recording from the episode is still available, but if you had difficulty listening or just skipped it altogether, you can catch up with us here.

Find sources in our original post of the episode: Coke Is Not It

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Just Gravy 5: Polio, Pepperoni, and Pizza Rat

The United States suffered its first polio epidemic in 1894, and it wouldn’t be until the 1950s that scientists could actually see the virus with a microscope and develop a vaccine. It was originally theorized that Black and Brown people did not suffer from the virus despite statistical evidence of outbreaks in Chicago and Maryland.

Join us as we discuss the racist history of polio, eat some delicious pizza made with toppings from Red Hog, and discuss how their business is carrying on the tradition of using the “whole animal”. There is also a special guest appearance from the mouse that is stalking Darryl’s home and keeps evading capture.

Just Gravy 5 Sources:

African-Americans, Polio and Racial Segregation
By Daniel J. Wilson, PhD

Race and the Politics of Polio
Warm Springs, Tuskegee, and the March of Dimes
Naomi Rogers, PhD

How the Poor Get Blamed for Disease
In the 1960s, health authorities capitalized on middle-class fears of urban decay to promote vaccination, redefining measles and polio as illnesses linked to poverty. By: ELENA CONIS

The History of Vaccines, An Educational Resource By The College of Physicians in Philadelphia

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E9&10. Fannie Lou Hamer in 2 Parts

Fannie Lou Hamer Part 1
Fannie Lou Hamer Part 2

In our 2 part series on Fannie Lou Hamer, we examine her life and accomplishments through the lens of farming and food justice.

Part 1 takes a look at Hamer’s early childhood in Mississippi including her polio diagnosis, working as a sharecropper, and her academic achievements. We set the scene for Mississippi and the U.S. from the time she was born in 1917 till the 1960s when she began her work in Civil Rights. Fannie Lou’s pre-icon years definitely had their struggles but we also include her leadership, success, and joy.

Part 2 picks up where we left off in the first episode – Hamer and a group of other Black folks trying to register to vote. We follow her as she steps into her first leadership role with SNCC and listen to part of her speech at the Democratic National Committee credential panel in 1964 that was so compelling, President Johnson interrupted it to try and silence her. Largely focusing on her work in food justice, we cover her incredible work with the Freedom Farm Cooperative and the Sunflower Pigs pig bank.

Sources for E 9 &10. Fannie Lou Hamer

Civil rights crusader Fannie Lou Hamer defied men — and presidents — who tried to silence her By: DeNeen L Brown

Mississippi Public Broadcasting: Fannie Lou Hamer Stand Up

PBS Fannie Lou Hamer American Experience

https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/fannie-lou-hamer

FLH Wikipedia

FLH Food Activism Pioneer in Food and Wine (by Nia-Raquelle Smith)

American Rhetoric Online Speech Bank

The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer: To Tell It Like it Is

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E8. Black n’ Cheese

Mac n’ Cheese is an all time favorite of ours, but Kelly did not realize that Darryl didn’t grow up with it as an “everyday food” until we recorded this episode. We investigate how Black culture made this food a special occasion dish and perfected it in a way that made it exceptional enough to serve it at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

We go all the way back to 1AD and trace the history of this pasta and cheese dish all the way through colonization, emancipation, and the era of soul food. Darryl cooks the mac n’ cheese he grew up with, which was one of the first dishes he helped out with in the kitchen, and we talk about our love for Tillamook cheese.

Sources for E8. Black n’ Cheese

THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF MACARONI AND CHEESE

The History of Slavery in the Cultivation of Mac & Cheese From Elitist Dish to Cultural Staple 

Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time

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E7. Dieting While Black Part 2

In Part 2 of Dieting While Black, Kelly and Darryl get into their own personal experiences dealing with body image and fat phobia. They review the history of fat phobia, race, and the long practice of “othering”. Myths about diets are revealed and they evaluate health (and lack of care) as another system that has been created in our culture and is supported by our government by giving more money to drug research instead of food subsidies.

They end the conversation by discussing self-care and ways that they move and exercise with love and care to their bodies. Food and Health and Bodies and Racism are all so tightly linked together, we hope you listen with an open mind.

Sources for Ep 7. Dieting While Black Part 2

CNN Healthline.

Examing the Racist Roots of Fat Phobia

Venus Figurines of the European Paleolithic: Symbols of Fertility or Attractiveness?

Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong

Fearing the Black Body

You Have the Right to Remain Fat

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E6. Dieting While Black Part 1

We’re back in the New Year and we’re here to talk about dieting. Darryl and Kelly discuss their own experience with diets, the bold choice to take up space, and the different ways it affects men and women.

We also got the chance to talk with our friend Leslie Cuyjet a Louisville KY native and professional dancer based in New York City. We discuss Leslie’s work, relationship to diets, and how things are changing in the world of dance as the BLM movement continues. Leslie brings her perspective on body image as a black woman whose own body is a main component of their work.

On a personal note, I wanted to include this picture of Darryl and me that we had taken when we were making the website. When I reviewed the pictures, I felt devastated. To me, I looked bigger than I felt and didn’t like the way my stomach pushed out over my jeans. But since then (this may be surprising) I have stopped trying to lose weight. I have put my scale away, stopped counting calories, and also threw away those jeans. Not only were these all things that were not serving my health, I’ve realized that the way I look at my own body is a practice in fat phobia, and I was approaching my wellness in a way that looked at my own body as evil.

This is all to say that it takes time and patience to move beyond the cultural ideas that fat is bad and dieting for weight loss is good. Be kind to yourself, send love to those parts of your body that you often hate, and maybe go outside for some fresh air. Treat yourself with love and kindness as we move into this New Year. Cheers!

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Just Gravy 3: Waldorf vs. Watergate

We posted our holiday episode last week, and if you haven’t had the chance over this busy week to listen to it (just like it took us a week to post it here on the blog), then you can check it out now.

Darryl and Kelly got together to discuss some of their weird family foods and the little they know about the origin of these dishes. We look forward to doing more in-depth episodes on these “salads”in the future.

If you have weird dishes that your family serves, please tell us about them in the comments or send us an email at butterpecanpod@gmail.com

Thank you all for following us in 2020 as we began this podcast – it has been one of the few gifts that the year has provided both Kelly and Darryl. This show has been something that we have both wanted to do for some time and it somehow got dug out of this insane, horrible, depressing year. We look forward to a big 2021 and hope to see you all on the other side.