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Episode

E 18. School Lunch Part 2

In our second episode on School Lunch, we take a hard look at how the metaphor of a Melting Pot to describe the necessary assimilation of American immigrants, might be a little problematic. The school lunchroom is the place where newly immigrated children were (and still are) introduced to the “American diet”. Where classrooms taught U.S. history and civics classes, the lunchroom taught that stew and cow’s milk was what you consumed to fit in. In evaluating these food choices, we look at food sensitivities across nationalities and how dairy specifically does not fit well into most children’s diets.

We also look at some personal stories of the lunchroom drama that immigrant children have had to deal with and the various reaction their parents had when requesting Lunchables over sticky rice.

There is a quick introduction to school lunch and how an American-born, European immigrant began the first lunch program in his German factories.

We end the episode by giving Darryl a short quiz on school lunches across the globe. If you would like to take a similar quiz and see how you do, you can find the same images he was describing at this website: Name The Countries These Lunches Were Served

Sources for E18. School Lunch Part 2

Public Schools in the Twentieth Century: The “Melting Pot” for Immigrants

Dietary Assimilation among Mexican Children in Immigrant Households: Code-switching and Healthy Eating across Social Institutions

Eating while immigrant: The bitter taste of assimilation and the joy of ‘stinky’ food

Being Bullied About My Lunch Made Me a Better Person

Lactose Intolerance by Ethnicity and Region

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Episode

E. 14 Juneteenth: As American As BBQ Ribs

The pictures above came from the Library of Congress Public Archives, and if you have an afternoon (or week) to kill, we highly recommend you checking it out. There is a search bar to use when you have a key word, location, or event that you specifically want to find information about. In our case, the term “Juneteenth” resulted mostly in images from 2020 and Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington D.C. The term “Jubilee Day” was too broad, and “Emancipation Day” included far too many results.

Finally, the term “Black Celebration” (after applying several filters) retrieved the first picture in the set. There is little cited about the picture and although the assumption is that the crowd is gathered for the 4th of July, the time in which the photo was thought to be taken was June 1939. The location is St. Helena Island, South Carolina and although Juneteenth celebrations originated in Texas, they had become more commercialized and were common in the South at this time.

The second photo was a result of basically searching “Black people” and “Texas”. This photo is of a man sitting in front of a Barbecue stand in Corpus Cristi, TX. We love everything about this photo – from the expression on the man’s face; to the 7Up ad; to the galvanized metal exterior and promise of Hot Sausages. Barbecue is also significant to the rich food traditions of Juneteenth and symbolism of red food and drink.

Join us in this episode as we discuss the origins of the celebration, how it has been observed through history, and the food that plays such an important role in this Day.

Food photos and recipes from the recording are soon to come. If you would like to know how to make the Strawberry Red Mule we drank during this episode, head over to our Patreon and become a member! https://www.patreon.com/butterpecanpod

Sources for E. 14 Juneteenth: As American As BBQ Ribs:

What is Juneteenth?

How Red Food and Drink Joined the Juneteenth Feast

Wikipedia: Juneteenth

Texas Monthly: The Ghosts of Comanche Crossing

Wikipedia: Big Red (Soft Drink)

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Episode

E 13. David McAtee’s BBQ

On June 1, 2020 David McAtee was shot and killed by the National Guard in the West End neighborhood of Louisville, Ky. Moments before his death, he can be seen on video checking his BBQ.

Kelly and Darryl cover the McAtee’s life, the events leading to his death, and the aftermath a year later. We also share a meal of jerk chicken, collard greens, and mac n’ cheese in honor of the man who sparked the idea for this podcast and continues to inspire us to be better.

We will be expanding more on BBQ in our next episode as we talk about and celebrate Juneteenth. But our discussion on BBQ does not end there – if you have any family BBQ secrets, memories or thoughts on David McAtee, or personal ways you celebrate Juneteenth, please comment below or send us an email at butterpecanpod@gmail.com

Sources for Episode 13. David McAtee’s BBQ

Wikipedia: Shooting of David McAtee

Louisville Barbecue Owner Killed in Police Shooting Fed a Food Desert

A Popular Louisville Restaurant Owner Was Killed by the Police. What Happened?

One year later, BBQ owner David McAtee remembered with two memorials in West Louisville

No Charges for Kentucky National Guard Members in Shooting of Barbecue Chef

David McAtee’s Family Mark One-Year Anniversary Of His Killing With Balloons, BBQ 

‘I cannot stand it’: family of Louisville man shot dead by police speak out

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Episode

Just Gravy 6: Q&A with Darryl and Kelly

Want to get to know us? Then listen up!

We took a break from our usual conversation about history, race, and food to talk about ourselves (and food). Join us as we discuss how we became friends, what we like about each other, and what food has scarred us for life.

Thank you all for listening and supporting us. We are overwhelmed by the attention that the podcast has received, and look forward to what we hope will be an ongoing project for years to come.

Us:

9 Local Podcasts You Should Be Listening To

Food, Protest, and Podcasting

‘Is butter pecan ice cream a ‘Black thing’?’ Louisville podcast explores how race impacts food

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Blog

FDR and The Secret of his Paralysis

As we discussed in our bonus episode on polio, FDR suffered from paralysis in his legs due to polio. At the time of his infection, he was a rising politician and didn’t let polio or paralysis stop him. Unfortunately, he went to great pains to hide his differently-abled body instead of showing the world that you can be in a wheelchair AND be President of the United States.

FDR would not allow photographs or film be taken of him in his wheelchair, being helped in or out of a car, or struggling to walk (he had developed a method using leg braces, a cane, and holding onto another person in order to walk when he needed). But in this rare footage from the 1935 White House Easter egg roll, FDR walks out to greet the guests. It is theorized that because of the large crowd, the secret service did not spot Fred Hill who was filming that day. Otherwise, they would have seized the camera and film.

The White House footage begins around the 1 minute mark and FDR walks out soon after.

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Episode

E9&10. Fannie Lou Hamer in 2 Parts

Fannie Lou Hamer Part 1
Fannie Lou Hamer Part 2

In our 2 part series on Fannie Lou Hamer, we examine her life and accomplishments through the lens of farming and food justice.

Part 1 takes a look at Hamer’s early childhood in Mississippi including her polio diagnosis, working as a sharecropper, and her academic achievements. We set the scene for Mississippi and the U.S. from the time she was born in 1917 till the 1960s when she began her work in Civil Rights. Fannie Lou’s pre-icon years definitely had their struggles but we also include her leadership, success, and joy.

Part 2 picks up where we left off in the first episode – Hamer and a group of other Black folks trying to register to vote. We follow her as she steps into her first leadership role with SNCC and listen to part of her speech at the Democratic National Committee credential panel in 1964 that was so compelling, President Johnson interrupted it to try and silence her. Largely focusing on her work in food justice, we cover her incredible work with the Freedom Farm Cooperative and the Sunflower Pigs pig bank.

Sources for E 9 &10. Fannie Lou Hamer

Civil rights crusader Fannie Lou Hamer defied men — and presidents — who tried to silence her By: DeNeen L Brown

Mississippi Public Broadcasting: Fannie Lou Hamer Stand Up

PBS Fannie Lou Hamer American Experience

https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/fannie-lou-hamer

FLH Wikipedia

FLH Food Activism Pioneer in Food and Wine (by Nia-Raquelle Smith)

American Rhetoric Online Speech Bank

The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer: To Tell It Like it Is

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Blog

We Got Some Press!

From The Courier-Journal :Louisville podcast explores how race impacts food

We were more than thrilled to be featured in a recent article in Louisville’s Courier-Journal a few weeks back. We had the pleasure of speaking with Dhalia Ghabour about our passion for food and history and where we hope the podcast will take us.

Check out the article by clicking the link or picture above.

***One thing that we did want to make clear was that this is NOT a Louisville Cream podcast, we just work there (and/or own the store). It consumes a lot of our life, especially during this pandemic, so the lines may appear to blur. But this is a Kelly and Darryl podcast and we represent only ourselves and opinions. We work very hard on the content and do no get paid by Louisville Cream nor aim to promote it (although I just sited the name, like, three times).

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Blog

Macaroni and Cheese is a Black Thing

Here’s the clip of Pat Robertson inexplicably not comprehending the glory of mac n’ cheese. Adrian Miller describes this interaction at the beginning of his chapter on the dish and we shared the audio on the show, but none of this compares to actually seeing Robertson’s bewilderment.

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Episode

E8. Black n’ Cheese

Mac n’ Cheese is an all time favorite of ours, but Kelly did not realize that Darryl didn’t grow up with it as an “everyday food” until we recorded this episode. We investigate how Black culture made this food a special occasion dish and perfected it in a way that made it exceptional enough to serve it at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

We go all the way back to 1AD and trace the history of this pasta and cheese dish all the way through colonization, emancipation, and the era of soul food. Darryl cooks the mac n’ cheese he grew up with, which was one of the first dishes he helped out with in the kitchen, and we talk about our love for Tillamook cheese.

Sources for E8. Black n’ Cheese

THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF MACARONI AND CHEESE

The History of Slavery in the Cultivation of Mac & Cheese From Elitist Dish to Cultural Staple 

Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time

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Episode

E7. Dieting While Black Part 2

In Part 2 of Dieting While Black, Kelly and Darryl get into their own personal experiences dealing with body image and fat phobia. They review the history of fat phobia, race, and the long practice of “othering”. Myths about diets are revealed and they evaluate health (and lack of care) as another system that has been created in our culture and is supported by our government by giving more money to drug research instead of food subsidies.

They end the conversation by discussing self-care and ways that they move and exercise with love and care to their bodies. Food and Health and Bodies and Racism are all so tightly linked together, we hope you listen with an open mind.

Sources for Ep 7. Dieting While Black Part 2

CNN Healthline.

Examing the Racist Roots of Fat Phobia

Venus Figurines of the European Paleolithic: Symbols of Fertility or Attractiveness?

Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong

Fearing the Black Body

You Have the Right to Remain Fat